Wednesday, August 3, 2011

PHIVOLCS Landslide Susceptibility Maps

The Philippines is still waiting for the so-called “big one,” which is a strong earthquake that will be generated by the long-overdue Marikina Fault. PHIVOLCS is doing the necessary preparations for earthquakes. The agency also reminds the public to be prepared.

Aside from the earthquake, PHIVOLCS is also reminding the people about the possibility of landslides during and after an earthquake occurred. As a part of preparation schemes, PHIVOLCS prepared the “Earthquake-triggered Landslide Susceptibility Map.” This map shows how susceptible an area in the Philippines are from landslides.

Based on the overview map that is available on the PHIVOLCS website, the areas that are high risk for earthquake-triggered landslide are mountainous areas like the Cordilleras.
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PHIVOLCS earthquake-induced landslide susceptibility map

View the “Earthquake-triggered Landslide Susceptibility Map” on PHIVOLCS website.

The map is shaded in different colors and every color has different meanings. The gray shade means that the area is not susceptible to earthquake-triggered landslide. Areas in green shade means that at risk to landslide at 0.3 MMI-IX and PEIS-VIII. Areas in orange shade are at risk from landslide at 0.15 MMI-VIII and PEIS-VIII. Areas in magenta are at risk from landslide at 0.07 MMI-VII and PEIS-VII. Lastly, areas in red shade are at risk from landslide at 0.04 MMI-VI and PEIS-VI.

MMI stands for Modified Mercali while PEIS stands for PHIVOLCS Earthquake Intensity Scale.

Aside from the overview map, PHIVOLCS also has Regional Maps of the “Earthquake-triggered Landslides Susceptibility Map” for regional and better view of the landslide prone areas.

The “Earthquake-triggered Landslide Susceptibility Map” and regional maps can be downloaded on PHIVOLCS website.

Read related posts about PHIVOLCS Tips on what to do before, during and after an earthquake.

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